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Book Club Pick

How it all blew up by Arvin Ahmadi

Book Club Pick: February 2021

Title: How it all blew up

Authors: Arvin Ahmadi

Series: Stand alone novel

Country: United States of America

Publisher: Viking, imprint of Penguin Random House

First Published: 2020

Pages: 266

Publisher Description:

Eighteen-year-old Amir Azadi always knew coming out to his Muslim family would be messy – he just didn’t think it would end up in an airport interrogation room. But when faced with a failed relationship, bullies, and blackmail, running away to Rome is his only option. Right?
Soon, late nights with new friends and dates in the Sistine Chapel start to feel like a second nature…until his old life comes knocking on his door. Now Amir has to to tell the truth to a US Customs officer, or risk losing his hard-won freedom.
At turns uplifting and devasting, How It All Blew Up is Arvin Ahmadi’s post powerful novel yet, a celebration of how life’s most painful moments can live alongside the riotous, life-changing joys of discovering who you are.

Review:

18-year-old Iranian American Amir Azadi is photographed kissing Jackson, a football player that he has secretly been dating. After being blackmailed Amir skips his high school graduation and flees to Rome to avoid being outed as gay to his conservative Muslim parents.

In Rome Amir meets Jahan, a proudly openly gay Iranian-Dominican man, who introduces Amir to gay culture and community.

I did feel that the depiction of Italian culture was a little stereotypical. I would have liked to have seen more exploration of Amir’s Iranian-American culture.

The novel moves between a retrospective look at the events that lead up to his decision to flee to Rome and his time in Rome, and an airport interrogation room, where his family is being detained after an argument on the plane home.

The novel is written with Amir’s first person narration as Amir tells his coming out story to U.S. Customs officials. It is also interspersed with transcripts of each member of his family being interrogated by U.S. Customs officials. This is interesting as it provides three other perspectives, his sister and parents.

Links:

Arvin Ahmadi Official Website

Arvin Ahmadi on Twitter

Arvin Ahmadi on Instagram

Source: I borrowed this book from my public library.